Gay Marriage and Religious Liberty: Two Scenarios

karen mcarthur

Scenario #1

Two men walk into a bakery.  The owner of the bakery, who runs the small shop by herself with some part-time help, comes to the counter.

Bakery owner:  Hello, how are you doing?  May I help you?

Man #1:  Yes, we’re getting married and would like to order a wedding cake.

Bakery owner:  Oh, I’m so sorry.  I would love to make you a cake for almost any other occasion, but I am a Christian and do not wish to participate in a same-sex wedding.  I know you disagree with me, but I feel that weddings are religious in nature and would be uncomfortable being part of your nuptials.  I know that creates some unpleasantness between us.  I regret that.

Man #1:  You are right.  I disagree, but I understand your point of view.  It is unlikely that I will do business with this shop again.  Many of our friends in the gay community will not want to purchase from your store.

Bakery owner:  Yes, I am sure that is true.  I don’t feel I can compromise on this point, but I would happily help you in any other way I can.  Thank you for coming by.  And thank you for respecting my feelings about the issue even if we don’t agree.

Scenario #2

Two men walk into a bakery.  The owner of the bakery, who runs the small shop by herself with some part-time help, comes to the counter.

Bakery owner:  Hello, how are you doing?  May I help you?

Man #1:  Yes, we’re getting married and would like to order a wedding cake.

Bakery owner:  Oh, I’m so sorry.  I would love to make you a cake for almost any other occasion, but I am a Christian and do not wish to participate in a same-sex wedding.  I know you disagree with me, but I feel that weddings are religious in nature and would be uncomfortable being part of your nuptials.  I know that creates some unpleasantness between us.  I regret that.

Man #1:  Oh, you’ll regret it all right.  The civil rights laws of this state are applicable to commercial transactions such as buying wedding cakes.  By not making a cake for our wedding, you will be in violation of those laws.  I shall report you to the authorities.  You will likely have to pay a steep fine and may face further penalties if you repeat this behavior.  I may also initiate a lawsuit in which I will seek damages.

Which is the better culture?  You decide.

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11 thoughts on “Gay Marriage and Religious Liberty: Two Scenarios

  1. “… but I am a Christian and do not wish to participate in a same-sex wedding.” Didn’t know baking a cake or arranging flowers, the profession you CHOSE to go into, constituted participating or even condoning a same-sex wedding. Religious liberty…..

  2. “But I am a Christian lawyer and your wife is a divorcee, so I refuse to participate in the close of this home purchase…”

    • I never realized closing a home was religious in nature. The internet is a constant source for learning and cats.

  3. The better scenario is the one where the owner goes ‘I opened a bakery and therefore have to treat everyone’s money the same. Here is your cake sirs. How did you spell your name?’ Next day, a white lady and a black man enter the same bakery and also have to be treated as though their marriage is valid.

    • Why does opening a bakery entail working for anyone for any reason? How many assumptions are you making with this kind of comment? Your comment indicates no respect for freedom. What if the baker is asked to make a cake for a Klan rally? “I have to treat everyone’s money the same!” It’s a ridiculous standard.

  4. Imagine there is a man who is a photographer and gay. A lady hears that he is great at taking photos at conferences. She tells him the date and location of the conference and he is available. They go to sign a contract and she tells him that it is a Atheist Against Same-Sex Marriage conference. He objects, saying that he himself is gay and cannot support such speech. She tells him that she is not concerned with his personal beliefs, but that she expects him to be present and to take pictures that demonstrate the happiness and truthfulness of the occasion.

    Should he be forced to photograph the occasion?

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