Terri’s Plight and the End of Life

I can identify with Alan’s concerns. I’ve sat vigil in a hospital room with a loved one and counted the long spaces between extraordinarily labored breaths. I’ve whispered in my grandfather’s ear and told him to “Go to Jesus. You don’t have to wait for us. We’re okay. We love you.” I saw an old man die and felt great relief he didn’t choose to prolong his suffering by being hooked up to a ventilator.

I feel differently about Terri Schiavo, though. My grandfather was actively dying. Terri Schiavo was not. She continued to live, requiring food and water, but still breathing on her own. There is a great difference between dying naturally and having life’s sustenance withheld in order to bring death. What has been done to Terri Schiavo is indistinguishable in my mind from what would happen if a person taking care of a quadraplegic relative simply refused to provide food and water.

I am highly disturbed by the fact that we don’t see unanimity of medical opinion about Terri’s situation. Some say she’s in a vegetative state, others say not, still others don’t know. I fear the judicial determinations have depended more on an assessment of whether her life is worth living than on slam-dunk medical evidence.

Finally, it should mean something that Terri’s family so keenly desires her continued presence. If she were truly vegetative, then it would be hard to believe they would fight as they have. They feel she is alive and interactive, no matter how minimally. This woman seems to me to be profoundly disabled more than brain-dead or vegetative.

I tried to go to sleep two nights ago after helping my week-old daughter get back to sleep. For some reason, standing by the bed in the moonlight I thought about Terri Schiavo and felt as if God would have me pray. The whole world is watching and I think He is, too.

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